Friday, August 1, 2014

10 Things You Should Know About the Common Core

October 16, 2013 by twalker  
Filed under Featured News, Top Stories

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By Tim Walker

An enormous effort to implement the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) is underway in more than 40 states and the District of Columbia. Districts are training staff, field-testing assessments, and evaluating technology requirements. Teachers are rewriting curriculum and instruction to prepare students for more rigorous coursework. Some states are further ahead than others. And as the 2014 – 2015 implementation deadline draws near, it’s likely that the road has been—and will continue to be—a bit rocky. But schools are forging ahead with the initiative—even as it faces opponents who are determined to mislabel the effort as everything from “Obamacore” to a “national curriculum.” The Common Core is a set of voluntary K–12 standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics. The White House did not create the initiative, nor is it leading it. The standards were developed by governors and state school officials, with input from a wide range of educators, content experts, national organizations (including NEA), and community groups.

The challenges surrounding implementation, however, are formidable. Teachers are concerned about adapting their classrooms to the rigorous new standards and receiving the proper training. Many are also wondering about the role of new assessments. But they also recognize the enormous opportunity that lies ahead.

“Educators desperately want to reclaim the joy in teaching—which means creative lesson plans, meaningful exploration of topics, and inspiring the joy of real learning in our students,” says NEA President Dennis Van Roekel. “Common Core could help achieve that if the implementation is done correctly.”

To reach that goal, all stakeholders must work together and take a leadership role in educating each other and the general public about the Common Core. It’s a complex subject. The following facts are intended to clarify key points, allay concerns about what the Common Core isn’t, and—most importantly—highlight how the standards can be the game-changer students need.

1. Most NEA Members Support the Common Core

Are many teachers anxious about the Common Core? Absolutely. Are some die-hard critics? No doubt. But there is no massive groundswell of opposition to the Common Core among NEA members. An NEA poll conducted in July by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research found that 75 percent of its members—teachers and education support professionals —supported the standards outright or supported “with reservations.” Whether it’s tighter content focus or opportunities for deeper critical thinking, the majority of teachers see the new standards as something to get excited about. Another poll released by the American Federation of Teachers revealed similar levels of enthusiasm, again indicating some educator anxiety, but confirming that AFT member support of the Common Core is strong.

2. “Drill and Kill” Curriculum Could Be History

The standards don’t dictate how teachers should teach. Quite the opposite. Teachers who support the Common Core—like Colorado educator Jessica Keigan—understand that teachers and their schools will determine how to help students meet the standards. “I understand the anxiety that many teachers may have,” Keigan says. “What I remind myself of is that teachers are making the standards work in the classroom. We’re taking the lead.” For Sue Yokum of Pennsylvania, the creativity the standards allow will make her final year of teaching a memorable one. “The Common Core gives me guidance, but it does not tell me what materials to use. That’s up to me,” explains Yokum. “It allows me to do something different this year and next year so that when I go out at 40 years, it’ll be the best year I ever taught.”

3. The Standards are Designed to Help all Students

Students from economically disadvantaged communities are often consigned to larger classes where they face an undemanding curriculum and outdated resources. As a result, too many students graduate without the basic knowledge and skills they need to successfully complete college or enter the workforce. Properly implemented, CCSS will ensure that all students— no matter where they live—will graduate prepared for college, careers, and citizenship. “The standards make things equal for all children in the U.S.,” says Colorado teacher Cheryl Mosier. “We’re not going to have pockets of high-performing students in one area compared to another area. Everybody will have a very high bar to meet, but it’s a bar that can be met—with supports [in place] for all teachers.”

In addition, alternative assessments are being designed to measure the growth of every student population. The World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment, for example, is a collaborative that advances the needs of English language learners. They have ensured that the new standards support and do not replace existing English language proficiency standards. Implementation of the standards should also address the needs of students with disabilities. The current plans for implementation should not in any way diminish access to the range of supports that students might need in order to learn.

4. Shakespeare is Welcome

Critics charge that the standards crowd out high-quality fiction, poetry, theater, and other imaginative texts in favor of nonfiction, “informational texts” believed to be an essential canon in the “college ready” arsenal. The standards explicitly say, however, that Shakespeare and classic American literature should be taught. While the standards do require increasing amounts of nonfiction, this provision refers to reading across all subjects, not just English.

5. Common Core Promotes Cross Curricular Learning

For Arkansas English/language arts teacher Kathy Powers, it’s not about fiction vs. non-fiction reading. It’s about integrating them with other disciplines, like English and social studies, or literacy, math, and science. “The CCSS will change my classroom teaching practice because I’ll infuse more of my instruction of non-fiction texts with fiction so the students get more of a content knowledge background,” Powers explains. “I work with our social studies teachers to bring in more of their content and vice versa.” The CCSS are designed to support cross-curricular learning and social studies, history, science, and PE teachers can and should be part of the effort. Many teachers already plan across subject matter, but the standards present a great opportunity to collaborate with colleagues in different classrooms. This will be a welcome change for many teachers—especially those who are new to the profession—who long to break out of classroom silos.

6. Success Depends on Better, Balanced Assessment and Accountability Systems

The next generation of assessments will provide better and more usable feedback for teachers, students, and parents. Most states that have adopted the CCSS belong to one of two assessment consortia, Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) or the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC). No one expects the transition to be easy, says Jim Meadows of the Washington Education Association. “It’ll take some time for the system to realign to support student learning tied to the Common Core. The standards are more rigorous but they’re also more focused. So the assessments are going to be different and there are going to be growing pains. When the initial assessment results come out, they may be lower,” explains Meadows.

Teachers overwhelmingly support an implementation schedule that will enable them to get up to speed before these new assessments are used to evaluate performance. NEA has long called for an end to high-stakes testing consequences, particularly during the Common Core transition period. In 2013, NEA, AFT, and 12 national education groups called for a moratorium of at least one year on high-stakes decisions based on new assessments aligned to the new standards. Over the next year, NEA and its affiliates will make it a top priority to work with policymakers across the country to improve the assessment process.

7. Implementation is a Work-in-Progress

Critical investments must be made to ensure educators have the time and resources to collaborate and make adjustments to classroom instruction. This includes more effective and sustained professional development—not just one-stop shop workshops and training videos, but the time and structure to collaborate with colleagues. Additional resources must be allocated to bring schools’ technology up to speed. Sound and effective policies will reinforce the standards, and teachers, education support professionals, and parents must work together to ensure the best possible implementation occurs so students can reap the benefits of that collaboration.

8. Teacher Leadership is Essential

As states begin implementation, teachers are advocating for the things that lead to success: resources, professional development, and time for collaboration. Teacher leaders are essential to the successful implementation of the Common Core. For this reason, President Van Roekel appointed 56 educators to an NEA Common Core Working Group last fall. The move is part of a nationwide effort to prepare educators to implement the standards. The group will ensure that teacher voice is prominent throughout Common Core implementation; facilitate communication about the standards; and assist in the development of engaging and relevant resources.

“This is an opportunity for teachers to discuss what isn’t working,” explains Kathy Powers. “We can use our voices collectively to critique areas of the Common Core that may need a little polishing.”

9. Parents are Key Partners

Parents have always played a huge role in helping students learn, and the success or failure of Common Core implementation depends largely on collaboration between educators and parents. But results of a recent Gallup poll indicate only half of public school parents had even heard of the standards. Parents and community leaders should increase their knowledge of the standards and work together to ensure fair and successful implementation. Educators should reach out to parents and pressure lawmakers to provide the resources and to make implementation easier for teachers and students.

10. Resources for Teachers Abound

A wealth of online tools and resources are available to broaden educators’ knowledge about Common Core content and the new assessments and provide sample lessons and links to individual state resources. NEA has released a Common Core toolkit designed to help educators prepare for implementation. The toolkit provides general background about the CCSS, separates truth from fiction about the standards, and offers hands-on practical assistance to help educators prepare for implementation. Users can download editable materials and presentations in small chunks that may be used in a variety of settings. Video resources suitable for use by individuals and teams are also available.

Comments

261 Responses to “10 Things You Should Know About the Common Core”
  1. Kristen Wilkins says:

    I know 25,000+ educators who are against common core. Your point one is wrong. Have all NEA teachers polled please! Your data will be very different.

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  2. Chris Fazzina says:

    Exactly how much money did the Gates Foundation give you people? Apparently, quite a bit more than my dues. Please stop shoving this Common Core Propoganda down my throat. Was the NEA apart of the creation of the Common Core? Who was?

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  3. Peter says:

    In thirty-five years of teaching, I have never been as saddened by the NEA as I am now. The unqualified cheerleading for the Common Core is a betrayal of classroom teachers across the country.

    The Core, created without any meaningful from real teachers, is the leading edge of a corporate power/money grab accompanying the dismantling of public education. Its very premise is that American teachers are failing and must be prodded and coached in order to do their jobs well.

    This, however, is the first time I’ve seen the NEA carry water for SBAC and PARCC. I thought the position was “CCSS could be okay if they don’t lead to more and worse testing.” Have you abandoned even that slim principle, too?

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  4. Rosie says:

    NEA = SELLOUTS!!!

    Let’s talk about how much $$$$ NEA & AFT received from Gates Foundation to promote CC.

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  5. Jennifer says:

    I was not poled about this issue. If I were, I would most definately NOT be behind the push for Common Core. How much has Bill Gates donated to your organization?

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  6. Linda says:

    Is the NEA so afraid of the current rash of union- busting rhetoric that it has lost its way on all matters? CC’s developmentally inappropriate standards (especially in early years and in math) is antithetical to a well-rounded education. Its reliance on over-testing and corporate profiteering is equally inappropriate and is contributing to a loss of childhood, a degradation of public education, inordinate stress on tteachers, and unrealistic promises. CC has not been longitudinally tested; it has no validity. I urge the NEA to use my dues to better inform its own leadership about the true costs of CC.

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  7. Geoff Ruonavaara says:

    These are fine talking points, but from what I have seen of the implementation, Common Core is leading to increased high stakes testing. Your claim that you will work for a moratorium is evidently not working well anywhere as teachers are being subjected to microscopic evaluations based on the mountains of minutia packed into Common Core. Legislators have pounced upon the idea that now they really have ammunition to shut down public education and turn to for profit charters that do not have to adhere to Common Core or any sensible alternative … including certification or experience. Drive out the experienced teachers and usher in the new, cheaper alternatives, e.g. Teach for America to fill the shortage.

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  8. Donna Shubert says:

    #11 The NEA can be bought by Gates $$ but even worse they are using members’ dues money to promote common core. There should be a full investigation into the NEA and AFT to see who they are representing.

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  9. Robin C says:

    I taught for 34 years in a very large suburban high school. All 34 years I paid my dues to NEA, IEA, and my local union and now I’m paying IEA-R. I’m so disgusted with the NEA’s position on Common Core – and its taking of money from the Gates Foundation – that I’m seriously thinking of quitting as a member.

    My school certainly jumped into RttT and starting aligning our already rigorous curriculum to the standards. At that time, none of our 250+ teachers were involved in terms of input on the standards, test creating, lesson planning, or, heaven forbid, teacher evaluation. And NEA certainly didn’t poll me in terms of this claim that “most NEA members support the Common Core.” How can they when 70% of NY students “failed” the test, test scores in Kentucky dropped 30% using a pilot exam, Pearson admitted to many mistakes/problems in grading the tests, states are pulling out of CC and legislative bills are being filed to stop it as well? How can teachers and parents support a test whose results they don’t see?

    There are so many twisted “facts” in this article that I can’t believe an education association published it.

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  10. Peter says:

    You have got to be kidding me– the comments that were previously here are being erased??!!

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  11. Peter says:

    Oh, wait. Never mind. Apparently I’m suffering some sort of intermittent glitch here. Which raises a new question– why isn’t there a way to erase something particularly stupid that I’ve posted myself?

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  12. Lynn says:

    Common Core is developmentally inappropriate for my kindergarten students. Stop drinking Kool Aid and support what is best for children. There is nothing good about Corporate (Common) Core, and you know it.

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  13. Susan says:

    Things to make you go hmmmmm about some of the 10 things:

    #1? I wasn’t polled, nor were any of my 100+ collegues – none of us support CC

    #3? CC def ws not designed with the Spec Ed child in mind

    #4? really, just sat in a H.S. department meeting where we were all specifically told that Romeo and Juliet and the like are only relevant to College literature majors and their professors and that our kids should be learning real life things like how to write and read manuals.

    #7 & #8? very few teachers in my district received training, despite asking for it, and are still unclear – b/c this one size fits all curriculum doesn’t work for a diverse school population

    #9? Not only are the parents uninformed, but many are uninvolved, yet they are not held accountable for their kids grades – ps – parent teacher night – many of my colleagues had 0 parents show up

    #10? You mean engage NY? give me a break – those youtube videos that keep crashing or don’t start at all

    YOU FORGOT to add a #11 – - exactly how much $$ did you get from the Gates Foundation? SHAME SHAME on you for even printing this story – where exactly do my dues go???

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  14. ME says:

    There is no wonder that history is not a subject thought important by the common core advocates. If so too many people would remember how the NEA stood AGAINST testing and for independent classrooms free from government intrusion. Also Americans would not be made into slaves by all consuming government and their accomplices. TO paraphrase Patrick Henry I ask the NEA, is money or looking good to the ruling class so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

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  15. TeachWA says:

    Wrong, wrong, wrong, on so many levels. I’m ashamed of the NEA. I don’t pay dues to have the leadership carry water for Arne Duncan and Bill Gates. Wake up and back us up here! My guess is that your poll numbers are swapped: 25% of teachers support CC and 75% of us see it for what it is. Or maybe the stats you present here do not match the question you actually asked?

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  16. Barbara says:

    I agree with the person who said that this program is not developmentally appropriate for the younger kids. Why do we keep having all children pegged the same…round pegs do not fit in square holes. Let us get the basics down and then begin to let students explore. along with this the amount of testing being required is absolutely unbelievable.

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  17. NewTeacher says:

    Is this a joke? Seriously, NEAToday? Unless I counted wrong, doesn’t secondary English have like 46 standards? And I am to be *thankful*? Maybe we need less, not more. Check out THIS article.

    http://www.wired.com/business/2013/10/free-thinkers/all/.

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  18. Teresa W. says:

    Why has the NEA not polled it’s own members? You will find that we don’t support the CC because most states have standards that were working very well for the students. What didn’t work was all 50 states having different tests, different text books, different everything. Bad for profits for the education corporations. It is time NEA members step up and make changes in our leadership if this is the “leadership” offered. NEA members do not support the common core!

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  19. skoolteacher says:

    Funny how you can’t “like” any of these comments-! I thought many were very likable!

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  20. Sandra says:

    OMG! SHAME on you for supporting the Common Core. Susan had it right – this is a MESS! No training for the teachers in MY district. Everyone has been forced to develop his own curriculum. Where is the continuity? God help these poor children next year. And the year after that. They will be the big losers in this takeover of the late, great American educational system!

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  21. ME says:

    This article is simply regurgitated talking points from the Common Core website. However they forgot one, that teachers were involved in the creation of Common Core. This is simply not the case. From their website

    Myth: No teachers were involved in writing the Standards.

    Fact: The common core state standards drafting process relied on teachers and standards experts from across the country. In addition, there were many state experts that came together to create the most thoughtful and transparent process of standard setting. This was only made possible by many states working together.

    They dance around the truth that no teachers had input on the creation of the standards just that their were involved in the drafting process. How much of their input was considered? Who were these teachers? And who were these so called state experts? So much for transparency!

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  22. Carla says:

    This article is full of lies. I am YET to meet an educator that is happy with Common Core.

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  23. Meg Norris says:

    The Gates Foundation gave money to:
    National Education Association – $7,356,432
    American Federation of Teachers – $11,343,925
    Parent Teacher Association – $2,721,386
    National Governors Association (NGA) – $25,139,674
    The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) – $79,033,581

    Now….tell me again how CC is a good thing? NEA, AFT, PTA = have all sold our children and our teachers out!!!!

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  24. kathie says:

    “There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious—makes you so sick at heart—that you can’t take part. You can’t even passively take part. And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop. And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all.”
    ? Mario Savio

    CC$$ are about destroying education, educators, and children….follow the money! it leads to billionaires who want to line their pockets, and they do NOT car who they hurt….i am withdrawing my membership from NEA after 26 years until you STOP supporting the CC$$!!!!

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  25. NEA Not Ever Acceptable to not consider your members opinions…..how could you be sooooo bracken as to throw this up in there faces……..

    Do you realize EATEN apples do not look inviting at all….this is not whole or wholly good……. this is all about $$$ and you are going to lose membership if you keep these kinds of messages up that show you are NOT IN TOUCH with whom you REPRESENT…… ^o^

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  26. Meg Norris says:

    Oh and if you want to know exactly WHY standards don’t work try this: http://dianeravitch.net/2013/07/05/robert-shepherd-common-core-requires-teaching-abstract-skills-not-content/

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  27. Jim says:

    NEA who are these teachers that support CC? Did you survey Teach for America? Taking Mr. Gate’s money has destroyed your credibility. We all knew that unions were being attacked but now it seems to be an inside job. Keep writing your pro CC propaganda but just know we don’t believe a word of it.

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  28. ELF says:

    Your data isn’t rigorous enough. The vast majority of teachers HATE this disaster! We know NEA has been bought off. You’re throwing your own members under the bus? Thanks for nothing and good luck with that suicide mission.

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  29. JonNY says:

    I can NOT believe NEA would promote this corporate garbage! I want my Union dues back!!! Stop bowing down to this nonsense or I will vote to disaffiliate with you Nationally. I have watched great teachers reduced to tears by this canned nonsense. Stand for your MEMBERS not the dollars you get from Gates! You should all resign, and get people in leadership that speak for teachers and children!

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  30. Cheryl says:

    Until the Common Core is rewritten by teachers rather than never-taught Michelle Rhee minions; Until Common Core has been completely separated from and unlinked from the high stakes testing forced on students by USDOE and states as part of the package; until the Common Core reflect a balanced curriculum that includes the arts, physical education, the humanities and math and science; and until the Common Core has been redesigned to be developmentally appropriate– no teacher worth his or her salt can approve of them because they violate so many of the basic tenets of a well designed education!

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  31. Jim says:

    Last time I looked this was at 28 comments. Now it’s 16. I see this must be the way NEA conducts it’s surveys. This member’s previous comment was deleted.

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  32. David Zeeman says:

    I’m seriously thinking that it’s time to break with the NEA. They’ve lost their minds and are no longer representing the interests of students, teachers, and parents. When did NEA sell out??

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  33. Chris says:

    NEA has apparently lost (or sold) all connection to reality. Teachers have little to no say in the implementation and “evaluation” of the CC$$, and it is, after all, the implementation that matters. On the issue of Common Care, NEA is not effectively representing its membership. Maybe you should consider writing an improvement plan before you fraudulently collect any more of your members hard earned money.

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  34. Lynette says:

    ^o^. I am SO disappointed to find that my very own union is drinking the CC Kool-aid. Where are your member voices? Where is the dialogue? I do not know of any educator touting the CC flag. It comes down to money and who is paying for what. How much has the NEA received to promote CC?

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  35. Steve says:

    First as teachers proof read before you hit post. Secondly clearly many teachers don not support CCSS. “Common Core is a set of voluntary K–12 standards” Can I opt out? shame on you NEA.

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  36. Kristie says:

    I was angered and saddened to read your article on Common Core. As a parent and a teacher I completely disagree with almost all your points. Where is the data to support your claims? I agree with the concept of high standards as ALL teachers do but the one size fits all approach is worthless. Please take the time to do some more research and maybe poll more than a few select teachers…..

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  37. Mandy says:

    You must have received quite a payoff to promote this garbage. Im glad my daughter graduated and doesn’t have to deal with this. By the way, I think you LIED about your statistics. Shame on you for hurting our kids with this.

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  38. Julie says:

    I have not spoken to a single NEA member who supports Common Core. It sounds like only the “top” supports it, not the MAJORITY!

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  39. Kathie Wing Larsyn says:

    why can’t i like any of these comments against the CC$$??? also, i wasn’t polled….the CC$$ are basically the take over of education by billionaires who do NOT care that they are inappropriate and based on junk science! the lies are so many on your graphic, i would have to write a research paper to counter them all….shame on you! ^0^

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  40. Rat Fink says:

    You have SOLD OUT YOUR OWN MEMBERSHIP. Sold us right down the river, due to your endless greed. You think we’re all idiots and can’t see it, but I hope to Jesus that you will be shown what folly this was when it eventually all comes crashing down as the consummate failure that it is.

    SHAME on NEA.

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  41. Anna says:

    I am an AR rep for my building. I have teachers leaving the union over this issue. I might join them. I joined the union because they negotiate our contracts, protect us from un warranted malpractice claims, protect our rights for due process and stand up for children. At least I thought they did. Now I find my dues are being used to promote unfair and unvalidated uses if standardized testing which is a direct affront to due process. My dues are being used to promote the unlawful gathering of student and teacher data which is a breach of our right to privacy. I find that my dues are being used to promote standards that at least for young students and possibly older students that are developmentally inappropriate which denigrates students natural growth patterns. I do not trust your survey as it denies what I see and hear on a daily basis. I too call for a change in the leadership of our union.

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  42. BillEA says:

    I’ve been a lifelong member of NEA (18 years and counting). That will change next year if you do not start truly representing your membership. Where are all these CCSS supporters you brag of? I’ve read 40+ comments on this article and not one favorable. NEA will have to rely solely on Gates Foundation lucre once membership plummets. Mark my words, we WILL abandon you in droves.

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  43. Jolie says:

    Contrary to the myth published here, the CCSS were NOT developed with meanngful teacher input! And while some of the standards may be good in theory, the reality is that it has led to MORE skill and drill class work and more standardized testing, not less. Thanks for selling out to Gates, NEA leaders.

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  44. Jolie says:

    That should have read “meaningful” in my comment above. Sorry…typing on my phone.

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  45. Abby vaile says:

    Today at a professional day my state organizationOEA led us in the discussion of why we need to fight against Michelle Rhee, the Koch Brothers and ALEC because of their paying off politicians to lead them to endorse their “deform”strategies. I did not however hear a word at how the federal government used threats of pulling money from states if CC wasn’t adopted. CC was formulated by two trade organizations-not education experts-namely teachers, administrators and professional educators from pre-school to college. I am a FR that has had it with the NEA. How can you endorse the uber costly CC?!!!!! Someone’s going to reap much from this fiasco, but it will not be our children!!!

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  46. Sheila stark says:

    What could I possibly add to the many comments of my union brothers and sisters? I am ashamed of neA and aghast that this article was published with all of these lies. We pay our dues so that we may protect ourselves and PUBLIC EDUCATION. NEA appears to have sold out. You wonder why membership is down? This is a huge reason! Not to be crude, but this union needs cojones.

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  47. Katie says:

    I too am saddened and disgusted by NEA. I have been a member since 1989 but this may be my last. I am a strong believer in the value of our union, however I am dumbfounded by the fact that today they have become cheerleaders for the very mechanism that is intended to destroy us and our cherished public schools. You’ve been duped, NEA. Gates knew your support of CC$$ would weaken the membership – which is exactly what the corporate deformers want! You ate the dang apple, the forbidden fruit. You took Gates money and now their dreams are coming to fruition. Shame on you.

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  48. Mike Archer says:

    CCSS

    I am a nationally certified teacher from Florida (now retired) asked to come to Washington to help finalize the common core standards. I supported them at the time but after study I changed my mind. Here’s why. The standards:
    1. Perpetuate the overuse / misuse of high-stakes testing.

    2. Will divert funds away from real needs such as computers, science labs, classroom talent, job training, and college-prep electives.

    3. Impose developmentally inappropriate levels of regimentation upon our youngest students, and inflexible expectations upon special ed students and English language learners.

    4. Come with an outrageous theft of personal, private student information that should remain family business but will be given to corporations.

    The theory of disaster capitalism fits here. Education budgets are a target for corporations. They create fake data to claim a crisis exists, then use politicians to sell it and rubber-stamp the “solution” – new laws which transfers that public education money into corporate hands. The education reformers are divided into two groups – the profiteering elites who see students as revenue, and the sad, often well-meaning dupes who obediently play their roles in the scam.

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  49. Kman Ivan says:

    The NEA cares little about its memebership.It’s all about the $$$,how long do you think the SAT board president and creator of the ROTTEN CORE actually taught…His name is Coleman…and CHECK THIS OUT!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Coleman_(consultant)

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  50. Kman Ivan says:

    You should then know the creator of the ROTTEN CORE is a founding member of this little gem with Ms. Rhee:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StudentsFirst

    And this is what our union supports!

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  1. [...] article in NEA Today by Tim [...]

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  2. [...] is chalked up to faulty implementation by teachers, not because of the standards themselves.  You can read it here.  If you have followed Common Core for a while, none of what is in this article is new [...]

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  3. [...] Here are 82 comments written by teachers who commented after this week’s National Education Association (NEA) promo article about Common Core. The article is here. [...]

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  4. [...] is chalked up to faulty implementation by teachers, not because of the standards themselves.  You can read it here.  If you have followed Common Core for a while, none of what is in this article is new [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. [...] Here are 82 comments written by teachers who commented after this week’s National Education Association (NEA) promo article about Common Core. The article is here. [...]

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  6. [...] At any rate, last week, NEA posted a great article on its NEA Today website.  The title?  10 Things You Should Know About the Common Core.  Written for its members, the article seeks to poke some holes in the urban legends around [...]

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  7. [...] 10 Things You Should Know About the Common Core [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  8. [...] all fairness I tried to find more positive links regarding common core. I did find some. This post from NEA tells of the goals of common core. The NEA stresses that common core does have the best interest of [...]

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  9. [...] NEA Today published an article claiming that 75 percent of their members supported Common Core Standards. Insulted and betrayed by their union, more than 200 teachers immediately reported that they had not been surveyed and that they knew of no teachers in their schools who supported Common Core Standards. Others implied that the union knew that the majority of teachers hated Common Core and that the union refused to represent those teachers. [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  10. [...] are beginning to revolt against being held accountable for failed policies. They have been made invisible, and their [...]

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  11. [...] are beginning to revolt against being held accountable for failed policies. They have been made invisible, and their [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  12. [...] NEA Today published an article claiming that 75 percent of their members supported Common Core Standards. Insulted and betrayed by their union, more than 200 teachers immediately reported that they had not been surveyed and that they knew of no teachers in their schools who supported Common Core Standards. Others implied that the union knew that the majority of teachers hated Common Core and that the union refused to represent those teachers. [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  13. [...] poured into the Common Core. So Van Roekel is buying boxes of band-aids. The following is from the NEA website with my understanding of what each statement [...]

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  14. [...] district policy. However, teachers hold their unions responsible for falsely representing them. NEA Today published an article claiming that 75 percent of their members supported Common Core [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  15. [...] can just hear the profane condemnation from the American Federation of Teacher and the National Education Association opposing the mere mention of God in their secular temples of perdition. Irony excluded how biblical [...]

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  16. [...] can just hear the profane condemnation from the American Federation of Teacher and the National Education Associationopposing the mere mention of God in their secular temples of perdition. Irony excluded how biblical [...]

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  17. [...] For love of CC (This article is very pro CC, and I do not agree with it, but I figured I should share it with you all anyway!) [...]

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  18. [...] 36. 10 things you should know about common core- NEA today [...]

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