Friday, October 24, 2014

Crazy Things People Say To Teachers – And How To Respond

December 6, 2013 by twalker  
Filed under Featured News, Top Stories

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By Cindy Long

Ah, the holidays. ’Tis the season to gather round the hearth, feast on turkey and pie, and enjoy the company and conversation of loved ones we see but a few times a year. And thank goodness for that! You love them dearly, but it’s exhausting fielding all those annoying questions about the teaching profession from your well-meaning but clueless family.

With that in mind, we’ve compiled a list of comebacks to crazy questions, so at this year’s holiday dinner (or any other time your professionalism is called into question: legislators, are you listening?) you can show the whole family why your profession is worthy of their highest respect.

Teachers are just glorified babysitters!

OK, you can pay me what you pay your babysitter. Ten dollars an hour for six hours (even though I actually work 9 or 10 hours a day) is $60 a day, times five days a week (even though I often work weekends) is $300, times 36 weeks a year (even though I’m taking classes and professional development year-round), is $10,800 – but that’s just for one student. Multiply that by 30 students and that’s $324,000. That’s a good start.

All your union cares about is bargaining for higher salaries and more benefits! What about the students?

Actually, when state laws allow us to, the National Education Association routinely bargains for student-friendly conditions like class size limits, staff training to improve student learning, collaborative time for sharing effective classroom techniques, school building health and safety, desperately needed classroom materials and equipment, and joint union-management problem-solving on ways to better teach students in low-performing schools. But shouldn’t we also have competitive salaries so we attract the best teachers? Don’t the students deserve that?

Teachers have tenure. You can’t be fired no matter what kind of job you do.

Tenure does not mean a “job for life.” It means there needs to be a just cause to be fired and you have a right to a fair hearing to contest charges. Any tenured teacher can be fired for a legitimate reason, after school administrators prove their case. If I want to thrive in my profession, I need to do a good job

Ooh! Must be nice to have summers off!

During my first weeks “off” I will be mapping out curriculum for the next year, cleaning and organizing my classroom, and catching up on professional reading and professional development coursework. So what do you say….want to trade places?

You’re way too educated to be teaching young kids. You should be doing something more challenging. Don’t you have an M.A.?

Teaching is a calling, not just a job. Compared to the challenges (and rewards) of the classroom, graduate school was a cakewalk.

It can’t be that hard to control a bunch of kids. Just have clear expectations.

Classroom management is really an art, and it’s not that simple. But if you think you have some special tricks, I’ll bring 30 kids over to your living room tomorrow morning to watch you work your magic.

If my current job doesn’t work out, I could just become a teacher!

If you have the desire and commitment to put 50-plus hours a week toward a large group of extremely diverse learners of varying abilities, please consider it. We always need more passionate teachers.

Is it true that the lunch ladies and custodians and bus drivers are members of NEA? What do they contribute to our kids’ education?

They’re called Education Support Professionals, and yes, they’re union members. They are on the frontlines of our schools every day – driving students to and from school safely, keeping our schools clean and environmentally sound, making sure our kids eat healthy meals, assisting students in the classrooms, and ensuring the front office runs smoothly. And they’re all essential to a well-rounded education for our kids.

You teach kindergarten? How nice to play with paint and glitter all day!

Sure, we finger paint in kindergarten. Not to mention learn the fundamentals of reading, math, and science that set the stage for the next twelve years of learning.

Why do teachers object to merit pay? You should be paid what you’re worth!

The trouble is defining the value of a good teacher by test scores. Unless, of course, you think your SAT score was the ultimate predictor of your worth?

See Also:

How Blaming Teachers Shortchanges Students

Comments

30 Responses to “Crazy Things People Say To Teachers – And How To Respond”
  1. Marsha says:

    To those comments about having summers “off”, my response is , “That means that what others do in 11 1/2 months, teachers do in 9 1/2 months. If you want to subtract winter and spring, we do it in 8 3/4 months.” Of course, I say this with a twinkle in my eye and a smile on my lips, because I wouldn’t want to offend anyone, particularly a parent. That is a sure way to get called into the principal’s office for a “conference”.

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  2. shiggity says:

    > Multiply that by 30 students and that’s $324,000. That’s a good start.

    Too bad it doesn’t scale that way. It’s not like for 30 students you work 30 times harder – you pass out some dittoed worksheets and lecture for twenty minutes. It’s a didactic setting. The administration backs you up if a student acts up. A babysitter could only dream of having kids so well-behaved under threat of detention, suspension, expulsion.

    > Actually, when state laws allow us to

    And they often don’t, and teachers strike illegally anyway

    > But shouldn’t we also have competitive salaries so we attract the best teachers?

    Higher salaries don’t necessarily mean you get the “best teachers.” My high school teachers were among the highest paid in the COUNTRY and they were terrible.

    > Any tenured teacher can be fired for a legitimate reason

    But you’re bulletproof against many situations (laid off, etc) in the normal workforce. It may not be a “job for life” if you’re caught sexually molesting kids, but then again I knew a teacher accused of sexual harassment and he didn’t get fired — he got transferred to another school. Nice.

    > During my first weeks “off” I will be mapping out curriculum… So what do you say…want to trade places?

    Actually, heck yeah I do. Pobrecita, you have to work when most people are working, and then during the rest of the summer you don’t have to. Give me a break.

    > Teaching is a calling, not just a job.

    Everything is a “calling.” Construction work is a “calling.” Picking my nose is a “calling.”

    > Classroom management is really an art, and it’s not that simple. But if you think you have some special tricks, I’ll bring 30 kids over to your living room tomorrow morning to watch you work your magic.

    Or you could have me audit your class, because clearly there’s a difference between a classroom and a living room. My living room is small, doesn’t have desks, and isn’t part of an organized program. Remember, we know what it was like, because we all sat there as students, so when you tell us it’s “not that simple” we know you’re lying.

    > If you have the desire and commitment to put 50-plus hours a week toward a [generalized diversity filler]

    The only reason I don’t is because the salary starts off low and I want to work harder to try to strike it rich than take the guaranteed upper middle class option. But the older I get, the more appealing teaching high school seems.

    > Sure, we finger paint in kindergarten. Not to mention learn the fundamentals of reading, math, and science that set the stage for the next twelve years of learning.

    I remember cutting out pictures of dimes and nickels in kindergarten and learning basically everything from my parents at home after school was out.

    > The trouble is defining the value of a good teacher by test scores. Unless, of course, you think your SAT score was the ultimate predictor of your worth?

    There’s a difference between a test being “the ultimate predictor of your worth” and one sufficient to determine merit. Many professions, like physicians, require routine certification tests and personally I’m in favor of anything that would increase the amount of objective merit assessed by teachers from what it is now — zero.

    I see stuff like this a lot from teachers. Too bad it’s always one way, you set up a bunch of straw men in a setting where no one can call you on it. If even one teacher was able to make valid points about why they’re such a martyr in an open debate I may change my way of thinking. Until then I remain as disgusted — if not moreso — as before I read this post.

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  3. Billie Hunter says:

    I started subbing 5 years ago after retiring as a clinical social worker. I have always respected the job of teacher; however, I never really knew it until I spent time in the classrooms of: adorable, undomesticated kindergartners, whining, often crying first graders, bossy second graders, swaggering fifth graders, impossible seventh graders, know-it-all ninth graders, and revolutionary sophmores. Third, Fourth, Eighth, Eleventh and Twelfth graders have given me the least amount of trouble but, any class room can become a battle-ground in the time it takes for the students to feel disrespected. It is an art to control a classroom of students’ behavior, as any student anywhere can become adversarial and there are a multitude of factors beyond the teachers’ control that contribute to the volatile mix of hormones, personality and need. Teachers deserve sooooo much more than they receive, both in time off and economically. Bet most people do not know how many school supplies are furnished by the teachers at their own expense, most probably to your own child more than once or twice during the year. Bet you don’t know they only have 30 minutes for lunch at most, sometimes no lunch at all….have you thought about how difficult it is to find time to go to the bathroom when you are responsible for the safety of a roomful of children. Do you think it is fun to do recess duty, bus duty, lunchroom duty? Before you make snap judgements about teachers, walk in their shoes for a week.

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  4. YAH says:

    But shouldn’t we also have competitive salaries so we attract the best teachers? Don’t the students deserve that?

    So how do separate the “better teachers” from the “not so better teachers?” You just said:

    The trouble is defining the value of a good teacher by test scores. Unless, of course, you think your SAT score was the ultimate predictor of your worth?

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  5. Robert says:

    Okay, “shiggity,” tell us how you would improve education.

    You’ve been there and seen it from your side of the desk.

    Please. I’m not all trying to be sarcastic. I’m interested in hearing what you have to say.

    During all of your years of being in school, did you have any good or excellent teachers? Which ones made a difference in your life? What were their qualities?

    I went to a small high school, grades 8-12. I took 30 different courses taught by 20 different teachers. (Some teachers I had more than once.) Six were excellent teachers… the other 14 were merely “presenters” of knowledge. They weren’t bad, just very average… almost mediocre.

    Hmm… elementary school, 1-6th…. maybe 4 good ones; 2 average/mediocre ones. 7th grade? English and math were great. Science, okay. History, poor.

    I’m curious, too, what is your type of work or profession?

    What do you look for in a good or excellent teacher? What type of teacher did you wish you had had back in school? What type of teacher would you want for your children?

    My good and excellent teachers inspired me.

    Sincerely,
    Robert

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  6. shiggity says:

    > During all of your years of being in school, did you have any good or excellent teachers? Which ones made a difference in your life? What were their qualities?

    Before I answer, here’s some context: I went through the public education system from K to 5, was home-schooled sixth grade, and then went back to public school.

    Those teachers that I liked were kind and understanding when someone asked a question, and related to the students. They seemed to enjoy what they taught, and met the occasional class disruption with a bemused reaction. These were few and far between. But perhaps a more poignant question is which, if any teachers, helped me grow the most — even if I resented them as a student, maybe they inspired me to greatness, looking back on my education as an adult. I’ve honestly considered this, and there were none of these. Not one. Most of what I learned was out of the textbooks, and I can safely say I learned more during my short stint at homeschool — despite the fact that as a child I earnestly hated it — than in any of my public school years. I learned sentence diagramming and the difference between direct and indirect objects. I learned math and history and chemical equations. It’s true I learned more math in public school — Algebra, Geometry, Trig — but again, mostly from the textbook.

    My parents saw I had an interest in learning at a young age. They were never ambitious people nor wanted to live vicariously through me, and when I told them I didn’t want to skip any grades, they indulged me. With them, I learned how to read and spell and multiply simple numbers before I started kindergarten, buying me three or four years where what I learned amounted to the story of Thanksgiving three or four times (did you know Pilgrims wear funny hats?) and how to write in cursive (which in this day and age, I use ALL THE TIME).

    I realize this isn’t everyone’s story. If it were, it wouldn’t be so crucial that kids get the right kind of learning for their needs so in that developmental phase where their brain is literally growing and they are learning how to read and write and the basic moral tenets of society. To answer your question, I think any kind of system would work that provided the following:

    - Personalized attention for children.
    - A hands-on approach to learning.
    - A social setting where kids can interact with each other.

    How can we provide this? I don’t know; I don’t control the education budget. But it is clear to me our system needs an overhaul, and playing the martyr card accomplishes the OPPOSITE of this objective. Giving teachers more money won’t make them better, nor will it change the system, just as giving money to a homeless person won’t cure him of his addiction to alcohol.

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  7. jim rossi says:

    dear shiggity, you seem to be very exacting in describing what you dislike about public schools. alas, you admit to not having any solutions. i think that you are a pompous jackass. however i will indulge you by giving you the two main problems in public school and you can bring your scorching intellect to the federal level and solve it for all of us.
    One… like social security and other gov’t programs, education (state) retirement systems are defined benefit and therefore not financially sustainable without infinite tax increases.
    Two… lack of accountability and parental involvement.Try to get an alcoholic or drug addicted parent to discipline their kid…..aint gonna happen dude!
    sounds to me you wouldnt last one day teaching in the environment my wife works in. so before you continue to chow down on your foot, go do some real world investigating.

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  8. Mike says:

    Shiggity, teaching has historically been a “second income” for a household. Back then, the husband was the primary breadwinner in the household and the wife/teacher was the second wage earner. Because of this, the wages were pretty low and it has been difficult to shake this initial wage category. Since then, there has been a concerted effort to fill this gap. This current effort is to make a teaching salary a bit more attractive to talented teacher candidates that would otherwise avoid teaching as a career choice because they could make more money in the corporate world. Also, consider the many examples posted online of people that have left the corporate world to teach and found that it was a bit more than they expected. There’s even an example in the comments of this article.

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  9. Amy says:

    Teaching is really hard just like being at home alone with your kids is hard. I tried it, and was overwhelmed, overworked and underpaid. Unfortunately, I am married to someone who chose teaching as his second career. It’s funny…he paid (is paying) a lot more to make a lot less. Caring for children really is a choice and a calling. It would be a lot easier to have a job where things were one on one, by appointment only simply because you could focus! And by the way, there are very few textbooks now. There are very few curricula with the way things change. Many teachers not only buy their own supplies, but also create their curricula, so before you judge, consider the challenges. Keep in mind, the way families and homes have changed. When I was in elementary school, most of my classmates had two parents and lived in a house. Things are very different now. Every job has its challenges,why are people so quick to criticize teachers? If you think it’s so easy, then try it.

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  10. Wendy says:

    Shiggity, what do you do when your students don’t have enough to eat at home, or their parent(s) are incarcerated or absent, or they are living with their elderly great grandmother because mom is a drug addict or they are living in their car or a shelter? They come to school wondering if they’re going to get beaten when they get home or is there going to be food for dinner. School is their only refuge. Teachers are not just lecturers anymore as they were when you were in school. We are social workers and mentors as well as teachers. When a student comes in depressed because it’s Christmas time and they’re not going to get a gift, we also play Santa Claus and get them a pair of headphones or a winter coat because it will make them happy.

    Why don’t you spend some time volunteering in an urban school district (or be a sub–for which you will get paid the princely sum of $90 a day)? Then maybe you’ll see how things have changed in public schools.

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  11. Robert Bacal says:

    Certainly, often asked “questions” showing stereotyping of teachers, but if I can offer a hint. These stereotypes are based on very little information, of course, so here’s the question: By offering up these “comebacks”, do you honestly believe you will be able to change the opinion of the person with the negative stereotype?

    Or are you more likely to get into an argument that’s pointless and frustrating for everyone?

    If you want to argue with people, these comebacks work well. There are better ways to handle these situations that are a bit more sophisticated, and actually help to build bridges than fight.

    (Note how argumentative the comments for this thread are? How quickly things get into name-calling?)

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  12. All_American_Teacher says:

    Thumbs UP – and thumbs DOWN – are not working on this site.

    Shiggity – gets my THUMB DOWN for attempting to claim that:

    “Many professions, like physicians, require routine certification tests and personally, I’m in favor of anything that would increase the amount of objective merit assessed by teachers from what it is now — zero.”

    First, it is definitely NOT “zero.” Professional teacher testing is steadily increasing in order to maintain highly-qualified national status, up to AND including state licensing. Get a clue.

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  13. Luv2teach says:

    Yes, Shiggity definitely gets my thumbs down as well.

    Shiggity, you make the mistake of believing your limited experience is true for everyone. Clearly you are biased against public education, as your mother must have been, to have home schooled you. She was very good at passing her biases along to you, but neglected to school you in logic and critical thinking skills. Oops.

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  14. Tom Staszewski says:

    Subject: teacher advocate defends today’s school teachers

    Teacher Advocate Defends School Teachers and offers tips to inspire today’s
    teachers!

    Handbook dedicated to helping teachers succeed and stick with it throughout the
    entire school year!

    Tom Staszewski
    tomstasz@neo.rr.com
    814-452-0020

    In this era of policy change and educational reform at the K-12 level, suddenly
    “everybody” has become an expert on our school systems. In my opinion, there is
    a great amount of unjustified criticism that is unfairly being leveled against
    our schools and our teachers. Most of the criticism is unfounded, baseless,
    undeserved and distorted. Many critics of our school systems have never set foot
    in a classroom to see what’s going on —other than their own experience as a
    former student—and their criticism is erroneous and counterproductive. If they
    (critics) would take the time to better understand just how hard the teaching
    profession really is, they would change their criticism to face the reality of
    today’s schools and society at large. I believe that most critics would find it
    difficult to even make it through even one day in the life of a typical teacher.
    The essence behind the book is that today’s teachers are under a lot of pressure
    and scrutiny and there is a need for more support, recognition and appreciation
    for the good that they are providing for society. So the point of my book is to
    inform the uninformed about how difficult it is to teach in many of today’s
    schools. And to provide recognition to educators and to thank teachers for the
    positive difference they are making in society. I’ve always said that our
    schools are a reflection of society and society at large has changed and
    undergone a dramatic shift from previous generations. The book also focuses on
    the success stories and “what’s right” with our schools rather than “what’s
    wrong” with our schools. Unlike previous generations…in many homes today,
    whether it be a single parent household or with both parents home…many parents
    send their kids to school unfed, unprepared and with little or no basic skills
    and often with no social skills, etc.

    In my previous work as a motivational speaker and professional development
    trainer, I have personally worked with thousands and thousands of teachers
    statewide and nationwide and I have found them to be hard-working, dedicated,
    industrious and committed to the success of their students. It’s about time that
    someone has taken a stand to recognize and acknowledge the value to society that
    teachers are providing and to thank them for their dedication.

    What is the theme of the book?

    In addition to thanking and recognizing the good that teachers provide to
    society, the book is also a handbook that can be used by the teacher as a means
    of providing coping skills and methods to succeed in the classroom with the
    trials and tribulations of teaching. It provides a means of offering tips,
    strategies and techniques to make it through the day and to have a successful
    school year. In many respects it is a personal growth and development type
    handbook.

    From the first-year teacher to the most experienced veteran, this book provides
    an inspiring message that yes, indeed…teaching is the most noble profession. It
    serves as an acknowledgement of the importance of teachers and recognizes that
    “teaching is the profession that has created all other professions.” This book
    provides real-life tools, tips and strategies to have a successful school year
    and to persevere beyond all of the challenges associated with the profession.
    Filled with insightful and meaningful stories and examples, it will provide a
    pep talk to help teachers stay focused. Readers are able to maintain the passion
    that brought them into the profession and to develop a plan to be the best that
    they can be.

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  15. Marie says:

    I love (?) that people do not apply an adult perspective when looking back on their own education. They still see it with a child’s eyes. Teachers are judged as “Good” or “Bad”. If you will remember your college years, when you got a teacher who you didn’t understand – you changed classes. That teacher wasn’t good or bad (which are childish values) you just could not learn from their approach. K-12 teachers are like that, too. While they try to be flexible – using many styles of learning to reach all kids – there are some students that we cannot reach. We even craft classes to put each student with a teacher we feel will do best for them, Everyone has one or two teachers in their past who couldn’t teach to them. Teachers will have one or two students a year that escape their abilities. The children they couldn’t reach will haunt them every day, for life.

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  16. Marie says:

    AND I would bet $$$$$$$$ “Shiggity” has spent a day in a K-12 classroom as an adult or “he” would not be spouting such trash!!!

    Ignorance breeds hate – go volunteer and educate yourself.

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  17. Gail says:

    Poor, poor Shiggity. He really has been left in the dark ages. Why did your mother just do homeschooling one year. She couldn’t handle you!!! So she sent you back to the public classroom. Perhaps, if she had thought that the public classroom was so bad, she would have sent you to private school. But OOPS, maybe she couldn’t afford it. And remember, private schools don’t have to accept you. They contact your previous school and see what kind of student you were. As has been said before, “get of your misplaced opinions and get into a public classroom, preferably an inner-city one.” They might just change your opinion.

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  18. Ski says:

    As a teacher I am currently getting out of teaching for a while. I teach middle school and I can tell you that it is no cake walk. I have been teaching for 8 years ( full time) and this year I made the whopping sum of $32,000, that’s before taxes and out of that they deduct for my pension, taxes and medical and dental insurance. My monthly paycheck is on average $1700 a month- yes, that’s right, I have to live on that for a whole month. And for my great big paycheck that I earn I have to be to the students a teacher, mother, social worker, and psychologist, every single day that I am there. Oh yeah, and if little Courtney or little Jacob get a bad grade on a report card I have to explain why, not the kid – me. And did I mention that if we have to discipline them that you can almost always count on a phone call from an irate parent yelling in your ear over the phone? Not only are they pissed off that you corrected their perfect child but they then go on to tell you that you shouldn’t be a teacher because you are such a horrible person for torturing children the way you do. And let’s talk about the countless hours of work teachers put In at home grading papers, preparing lessons, and working on extra activities that we are not compensated for. We bring our work home every night and all summer. I love the kids and I love my job (even though it’s exhausting) but I can’t live on the paycheck any more so I’m leaving. It’s sad that when your growing up they tell you to find a career you love but they forget to tell you that it may not pay your bills. Every parent and citizen who bashes teachers ought to have to sub in a school for one week trying to manage 24+ kids and then they can tell us how easy it was.

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  19. Dan says:

    Critics like shiggity want personalized education…until they have to pay for it. It’s silly to expect that kind of attention in a classroom of 30 students (or even 20 students).

    How much time would qualify for “one on one” status? Ten minutes per day? That would mean a class size of 5 per teacher per class period. That would mean multiplying the salary cost by 5 or 6 (not to mention the cost of 5 or 6 times as many classrooms).

    How you gonna pay for that, shiggity?

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  20. Dan says:

    The single most important factor in my classroom is the PARENTING. If the parents have high expectations, I can have high expectations. If the parents expect nothing, then that’s usually what I can get out of their kids.

    Learning is a VOLUNTARY act. It cannot be forced. I can make great lessons, try to engage the students in relevant conversation, and provide thought-provoking activities, but if the student refuses to participate then nothing comes of it.

    I hate this assumption that students come to school ready to learn. The vast majority come to school looking for ANY way out of doing anything. Only a rare few are disappointed if they are simply given grades for doing nothing. We must acknowledge this is an ADVERSARIAL relationship most of the time. Teachers and students have opposing goals–I want to get the most possible results, they want to commit the least possible effort.

    It’s easy to see the problem of parents who are negligent (usually due to drugs). But there are other problematic parents. First are the “activities” parents–those who seem to think schools exist just so their kids can participate in extra-curricular activities such as sports or band or whatever. These parents let the kids prioritize the fun ahead of the classroom–and they will be down the teacher’s throat if the teachers try to hold the kids accountable for ignoring classroom obligations. Second are the techno-junky enablers–parents who give their children access to all kinds of home entertainment (from cell phones to internet to video games). These kids simply have no time for school. There are just too many tweets, too many YouTube videos, too many level-up perks awaiting them each hour for them to be concerned with tomorrow’s exam. These parents think they’re giving love when they are creating the next generation of minimum wage earners and college drop outs.

    And I must also add those parents who simply don’t think attendance is important. They let their children miss at-will (in some cases even asking them to stay home) and then can’t understand why their child is failing.

    This year, the above applies to at least 2/3 of my students. And here I am, being questioned on MY efforts when I am set up to fail even before the class is started.

    I know I can teach. Every year I have kids pass their AP exams. I get good performance reviews. But I am no magician. I cannot be expected in my 49 minutes of class to undo all the mess that’s going on from 3:25pm till 8am every day.

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  21. Reader says:

    Re: Summer off – let’s not forget the part where summer is the only time my home gets organized, well cleaned, and any other job that doesn’t get done the rest of the year!!

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  22. Marj E says:

    I’ve been teaching for 36 years and do not plan on retiring because this is MY second home. When my kids were small, I saw your kids more than mine.I have stayed until 7 at school and my students have run away from “home” to me. I believe with all my heart and soul that I have a vocation. I have tried other work which paid much better but always returned to school. I have taught from 5th grade to Community College in 3 states. Yet I am pestered by the district to retire. I am also a mentor teacher and help “newbies” whether they ask or not. ( Then they feel more comfortable coming to me for help especially with content.) I also am disabled since a student attacked me in class and knocked me unconscious. She was on meth. It took me two years but I came back. She took alot from me but I won’t let her take away what I love to do. Hopefully there is something in this ramble that you can use to rebutt the buttheads.

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  23. Carol Hendl says:

    The one fact that everyone forgets to make in response to holidays and summer break, is that teachers do not get paid for any days they do not work. Teachers do no get paid vacations.

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  24. Steve Galley says:

    Shiggity–

    Please, please, please bring your arrogant, know-it-all brilliance to my classroom. Please bring your SOLUTIONS, too. Oh, wait…

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  25. Tom Staszewski says:

    Tom Staszewski | author of Total Teaching…Your Passion Makes it Happen,
    published by Rowman & Littlefield.

    Tom can be contacted at 814-452-0020 or tomstasz@neo.rr.com

    “Subject: teacher advocate defends today’s school teachers Teacher Advocate
    Defends School Teachers and offers tips to inspire today’s teachers! Handbook dedicated to helping teachers succeed and stick with it throughout the entire school year! Tom Staszewski tomstasz@neo.rr.com 814-452-0020 In this era of policy change and educational reform at the K-12 level, suddenly “everybody” has become an expert on our school systems. In my opinion, there is a great amount of unjustified criticism that is unfairly being leveled against our schools and our teachers. Most of the criticism is unfounded, baseless, undeserved and distorted. Many critics of our school systems have never set foot in a classroom to see what’s going on –other than their own experience as a former student–and their criticism is erroneous and counterproductive. If they (critics) would take the time to better understand just how hard the teaching
    profession really is, they would change their criticism to face the reality of today’s schools and society at large. I believe that most critics would find it difficult to even make it through even one day in the life of a typical teacher.
    The essence behind the book is that today’s teachers are under a lot of pressure and scrutiny and there is a need for more support, recognition and appreciation for the good that they are providing for society. So the point of my book is to inform the uninformed about how difficult it is to teach in many of today’s schools. And to provide recognition to educators and to thank teachers for the positive difference they are making in society. I’ve always said that our schools are a reflection of society and society at large has changed and undergone a dramatic shift from previous generations. The book also focuses on the success stories and “what’s right” with our schools rather than “what’s wrong” with our schools. Unlike previous generations…in many homes today, whether it be a single parent household or with both parents home…many parents send their kids to school unfed, unprepared and with little or no basic skills and often with no social skills, etc. In my previous work as a motivational speaker and professional development trainer, I have personally worked with
    thousands and thousands of teachers statewide and nationwide and I have found them to be hard-working, dedicated, industrious and committed to the success of their students. It’s about time that someone has taken a stand to recognize and acknowledge the value to society that teachers are providing and to thank them for their dedication. What is the theme of the book? In addition to thanking and
    recognizing the good that teachers provide to society, the book is also a
    handbook that can be used by the teacher as a means of providing coping skills and methods to succeed in the classroom with the trials and tribulations of teaching. It provides a means of offering tips, strategies and techniques to make it through the day and to have a successful school year. In many respects it is a personal growth and development type handbook. From the first-year
    teacher to the most experienced veteran, this book provides an inspiring message that yes, indeed…teaching is the most noble profession. It serves as an acknowledgement of the importance of teachers and recognizes that “teaching is the profession that has created all other professions.” This book provides real-life tools, tips and strategies to have a successful school year and to
    persevere beyond all of the challenges associated with the profession. Filled with insightful and meaningful stories and examples, it will provide a pep talk
    to help teachers stay focused. Readers are able to maintain the passion that brought them into the profession and to develop a plan to be the best that they can be. ”

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  1. [...] along with some useful comebacks, compiled and written by Cindy Long and originally published in NEA Today, a publication of the National Education Association, the country’s largest teachers [...]

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  2. [...] along with some useful comebacks, compiled and written by Cindy Long and originally published in NEA Today , a publication of the National Education Association, the country’s largest teachers [...]

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  3. [...] along with some useful comebacks, compiled and written by Cindy Long and originally published in NEA Today , a publication of the National Education Association, the country’s largest teachers [...]

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  4. CSSC Card Test…

    Crazy Things People Say To Teachers – And How To Respond | NEA Today…

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