Saturday, August 30, 2014

If Your Class Looked Like America. . .

August 28, 2014 by twalker  
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10 Time Management Tips for Teachers

August 28, 2014 by twalker  
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For teachers, it never seems like there is enough time. Teacher Benjamin Schrage resisted turning his job into a 24/7 endeavor, and learned to work smarter, analyzing every moment of his work day, and identifying ways to get things done faster while improving efficiency. Here are 10 things he learned along the way. Source: SmartBlog on Education

STEAM Gaining Momentum

August 28, 2014 by twalker  
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STEM education–that’s science, technology, engineering, and math–has gotten an increasing amount of buzz over the past few years. And now, there’s a twist on STEM: the addition of the arts, making it STEAM. Supporters say a more focused inclusion of the arts helps kids become creative, hands-on learners by sparking innovation. A recent Michigan State study supports [...]

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School

August 27, 2014 by twalker  
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The first few days of school are a vital time to set the right tone for the rest of the year. Many teachers focus on important things like getting to know their students, building relationships and making sure students know what the classroom procedures will be. While those things are important, Alan November, a former teacher-turned-author [...]

Why Some Schools Are Selling All Their iPads

August 27, 2014 by twalker  
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Is the iPad really the best device for interactive learning? It’s a question that has been on many minds since 2010, when Apple released the iPad and schools began experimenting with it. The devices came along at a time when many school reformers were advocating to replace textbooks with online curricula and add creative apps [...]

Back to School 2014: Ten Soul-Saving Tips for New Teachers

August 25, 2014 by twalker  
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By Susan Anglada Bartley Susan Anglada Bartley, M.Ed, is the winner of the 2014 OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education. In 2013, she was awarded the NEA’s H. Councill Trenholm Human & Civil Rights award for her commitment to creating greater equity in public education. She teaches AP English and coordinates the Advanced Scholar Program [...]

Many Teachers Paying Out Of Pocket For School Supplies

August 25, 2014 by twalker  
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Imagine if you had to spend hundreds of dollars of your own Money just to get your job done. Lily Eskelsen García, President Elect of the National Education Association, said that’s how much the average teacher had to spend on school supplies for their students in past years. “The average teacher in past years will spend anywhere [...]

NEA Hosts Clinic for Students Eligible for Deferred Action

August 25, 2014 by twalker  
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By Brenda Álvarez Ten years ago, Aura Menjivar Lara made the long and harrowing trek from El Salvador to the U.S. She left her homeland—riddled with violence and despair—with dreams of a better life. Today, she wears an ankle monitor, which is usually reserved for convicted criminals on parole, fears deportation and the loss of [...]

NEA Back to School Tour Spotlights College Affordability Crisis

August 22, 2014 by twalker  
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By Anita Merina Calling college affordability “the universal cause that will unite educators, students, parents and communities,” NEA President-Elect Lily Eskelsen García spent the second day of NEA’s Back-to-School Tour shining the spotlight on Degrees Not Debt, the national campaign to reduce crushing student loan debt and make college more affordable to all. Eskelsen García [...]

What Are Schools Doing with Your Kids’ Data?

August 22, 2014 by twalker  
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Your child may be a history buff or a math whiz. He may excel at soccer or poetry. She may be planning for a career as a doctor or a lawyer. Each kid is unique, but there’s one thing all students have in common: They are data-generating machines. It’s not just their test scores and [...]

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