Saturday, November 1, 2014

Teachers: Finding Appreciation at Work

October 31, 2014 by twalker  
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So many of those working in our schools don’t feel appreciated — and one luncheon or certificate per year just doesn’t cut it. The daily demands are so intense and taxing that we all need more acknowledgement of our hard work in order to manage some of the stress we’re under: The acknowledgements help us [...]

A Simple Way to Help Poor Kids Succeed

October 31, 2014 by twalker  
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Here’s a deceptively simple way to close part of the achievement gap between poor and wealthy students: make sure that poor students are in school as much as their richer peers. A recent study found that absentee rates could explain up to 25 percent of difference in math scores between low-income students and less disadvantaged ones. [...]

U.S. Education Department Gets Stricter with For-Profit Colleges

October 31, 2014 by twalker  
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The U.S. Department of Education will introduce new regulations next year in its latest attempt to improve the job prospects of those graduating from for-profit colleges and universities. Under the regulations unveiled on Thursday and effective July 1, for-profit colleges will be at risk of losing federal aid should a typical graduate’s annual loan repayments [...]

Teacher Poll: Yes to Common Core Standards, No to Being Evaluated Based on Test Scores Linked to Them

October 30, 2014 by twalker  
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Do teachers like the Common Core, or do they hate it? A new poll from Gallup has found the answer is “both.” Teachers like the idea of national standards for what students should know and be able to do in reading and math, and the survey shows most think the Common Core is as rigorous as the [...]

This Is What Happens When You Criticize Teach for America

October 30, 2014 by twalker  
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In a recent interview, Wendy Heller Chovnick, a former Teach for America manager, Wendy Heller, referenced the extent to which TFA manufactured its public image, explaining, “Instead of engaging in real conversations with critics, and even supporters, about the weaknesses of Teach For America and where it falls short, Teach For America seemed to put a positive spin on [...]

Away From ‘Test and Punish,’ Toward a New Accountability System

October 29, 2014 by twalker  
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When even the federal government questions whether there’s too much testing, a new question surfaces: how should students, teachers and schools be held accountable? The nation’s two largest teachers unions – along with school administration organizations, business advocacy groups and school equity leaders – on Tuesday announced a new framework for accountabilitythat focuses more on a holistic ”support-and-improve” [...]

The Economic Impact of School Suspensions

October 29, 2014 by twalker  
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A recent report finds African-American girls were suspended at six times the rate of white girls, and more than any other group of girls (and several groups of boys). In 2013, 43 percent of African American women without a high school diploma were living in poverty, compared to 29 percent with a high school diploma and [...]

Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment

October 29, 2014 by twalker  
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Anyone involved in standardized testing knows two things: the results take entirely too long to get back and are completely impersonal, making that kind of feedback essentially irrelevant. In short, feedback needs to be personal, and it needs to be fast. To that end, educators are beginning to refocus their attention on relevant, practical feedback [...]

Schools With No Playgrounds Teach Kids Not to Play

October 27, 2014 by twalker  
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Many communities have moved away from valuing pay, particularly outdoor play. Societal changes (video games; increased access to high-calorie, processed foods), educational changes (more time in classrooms and less active time, despite all evidence suggesting that the more time children spend engaged in physical activity and play, the higher their academic achievement), and economic pressures [...]

Lily Eskelsen Garcia’s Letter to Time Magazine: Due Process for Teachers is Not a Rotten Apple

October 27, 2014 by twalker  
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On Friday, NEA President Lily Eskelsen Garcia wrote a pointed response to the recent TIME magazine cover story on teacher due process, or tenure. In a letter to TIME editor Nancy Gibbs and reporter Haley Sweetland Edwards, Eskelsen Garcia wrote, “In this age of high stakes tests and deep budget cuts, teachers need to be protected [...]

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